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Thursday, June 25, 2015

The Long Rail North - A Theater Review


The Long Rail North is a play that premiered at the Planet Connections Theatre Festivity this past week in New York City. It was written by Michael Hagins, and directed by Emily DeSena. The play stars Xavier Rodney, Morgan Patton, Michael Rehse, Natalie Ann Johnson, and Sam Lopresti. The play is set during the Civil War, and is about the relationship between an escaped black slave/AWOL Union soldier and a white daughter of a plantation owner, and their struggle to survive while travelling North as stowaways on a train.

Thomas (Rodney) is an escaped black slave who also left his regiment in the Union army due to finding that the North’s attitudes towards black people weren’t any better than the South’s attitudes. The South’s attitudes are more blatant and violent, whereas the North’s attitudes are more subtly insulting and condescending. He has rescued a 12-year old white girl named Molly (Patton) from the burning of her family plantation, in which her family and slaves were killed in the ambush, and is trying his best to be patience with her ingrained racist attitudes, all of which she had inherited from her father. Rodney commands the scenes with an intelligence that makes Thomas the smartest person in the room, on his own journey and trying to manage as a drifter and being split between allegiances and not belonging anywhere.

Molly frequently begins her sentences with “My daddy says that . . .” and often uses the n-word to address Thomas because she doesn’t know any better about addressing black people by their given names. Patton excels at playing a scared and confused young girl who doesn’t know what to think when her racist attitudes conflict with Thomas’s gentle actions, contradicting her father’s ideas about black people. While Molly needs Thomas a lot more than he needs her, he has dedicated himself to getting Molly to safety by hitching a ride on a train car going North, the full reason for it being revealed in the third act.

Along the way, they encounter a drifter/train robber named Cassie (Johnson), known as a fugitive by the name of “Coal Car” Cassie. Johnson delivers a fun performance full of charisma and adventurous spirit. Cassie stands up against the racist attitudes of the day, both out of kinship with black people and out of having nothing left to lose as a disenfranchised white woman.

The three stowaways are being targeted by both Union and Confederate soldiers, played with sinister relish by Sam Lopresti and Michael Rehse. They are both predators, not only looking to capture Thomas, but also to capture the child Molly as a “traitor” and to hang Cassie for her crimes.

                The play is heavy subject matter, and given the heightened recent media coverage of race relations and racially-motivated violence, it is a perceptive drama, though it was written nearly two years ago.

                DeSena’s direction and Hagins’ writing allows for the scenes to unfold naturally and deliver introspective character development without rushed exposition or filler moments. The five-person cast gives captivating performances that deliver the heaviness of the situations at hand, and transport the audience to an ugly time in history that has reared its head since then in many different forms.


The play will run through July 11th in the Planet Connections festival at the Paradise Factory.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Advantageous - A Film Review



Advantageous is a 2015 dystopian sci-fi drama directed and co-written by Jennifer Phang and starring Jacqueline Kim (also co-writer), Freya Adams, James Urbaniak, Jennifer Ehle, Jennifer Ikeda, Samantha Kim, and Ken Jeong. The film is a feature film expansion of Phang’s short film, produced for the sci-fi short film anthology web series FUTURESTATES. The film is a feminist sci-fi look at aging, identity, the female place in modern society, and wealth in the late 21st century. It is a fascinating film about technology and modern selfhood, especially as it comes to the price of using technology to become a better person.

               
Gwen Koh (Jacqueline Kim) is a middle-aged single mother who has been the public, yet underpaid, face of the seemingly innocent corporation that she works for, until she is demoted on account of her age and not being youthful or marketable enough for their faster technology-based future. She is struggling to support herself and her daughter Jules (Samantha Kim), and wants to send Jules to an elite prep school where a successful future would be guaranteed for her.

 Gwen hustles to come up with the money through egg donation, job interviews, and checking her bank balances, but is at a disadvantage in a society that celebrates youth and wealth. The class differences are stark in this world, with examples such as stunning visuals of grand, opulent city life contrasted with lonely poor neighbors crying in their apartments and news reports on teen prostitution.

Gwen and Jules share a vital relationship, especially with a single mother and only child. They share a close and loving bond, and need each other for love, family, and human connection in a tech-driven world. It is not only their financial future that is important, but their loving bond that is crucial to maintain as a family.

In order to ensure a future for both herself and for Jules, Gwen decides to use herself as a test subject for a new and experimental procedure developed by her company, where her identity would be placed inside of a younger body, as a chance to live life anew. The procedure would raise her advantage in the industry as a youthful and valuable member of society, and would allow for her daughter to have the best in society. Gwen justifies her procedure, saying, “I can’t let her become one of these women so desperate that they would do anything.” It is a risky move that Gwen takes in undergoing the procedure, and the third act of the film is a heartbreaking twist, as the real cost of the procedure is revealed, and is a sad and painful look at how women are valued in society based on beauty and social worth.


Advantageous stands out as not only one of the best science-fiction films of the year, but as one of the best films of the year, period. The film has an inventive story that touches to the core of human identity, aging, and mortality. The film won the Sundance Jury Prize for Collaborative Vision in January, played to a sold-out audience at BAMcinemaFest and is currently streaming on Netflix. I highly recommend this film.

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Short Thoughts on A History of Violence


I watched A History of Violence last week, and really liked it. It had a good slow, anticipatory pace to it, like violence was always simmering beneath the surface way before it happened. I loved seeing the build up to the diner scene, it set up everything in motion. And the way that Tom (Viggo Mortensen) kept laughing off accusations that he was a criminal made him look even more suspect.
I am a fan of David Cronenberg, so I figured I would like this film. And it made me like the Archer/Bob's Burgers scene even more, as it was very clever with Archer and Bob's individual histories and mirroring it from the movie:


Thoughts on Dope and Breaking a Monster


I saw two movies at BAM yesterday as part of their film festival BAMCinemaFest. The first was Dope, directed by Rick Famuyiwa which, is showing in both indie and mainstream theaters. Dope centered on a teenage black male nerd named Malcolm (Shameik Moore) who was a 90's hip-hop head in present-day Inglewood, CA, and dressed like a cross between Dwayne Wayne and the Fresh Prince. He has nerdy friends and works to maintain his identity while mingling with local street folks. He gets involved in a drug-dealing scheme through a convoluted set of circumstances, and uses his nerdy image as a cover to avoid detection.

I was mixed on it, liking the characters and style, but not so much the story. I liked the throwback hip-hop soundtrack; the heroes being black nerds; the story being influenced by Superbad and Friday; an awesome shout-out to the underrated coming-of-age movie The Wood; a funny performance by model Chanel Iman as a cokehead rich girl; Zoe Kravitz' performance as a young woman studying for her G.E.D. and dealing with both her drug dealing friends and the nerd protagonist, caught between wanting to be seen as more than just a sexy hookup but not leaving her past behind; and the nerds gaming the drug dealing system through their tech and science skills. The characters were complex and I liked the depth that was given to their personalities and attitudes. However, I didn't like the slapstick, silly parts; the gratuitous female nudity, the heavy-handed, melodramatic final monologue that was an anvil spelling out everything that was already shown in the film earlier, and the hero becoming a drug dealer, even if he had clever ways of distributing it. It isn't a bad movie, but it felt shallow sometimes.




The other movie I saw was Breaking a Monster, directed by Luke Meyer, a documentary about three adolescent black boys from Brooklyn (Malcolm, Jarad, Alan) who were a metal band called Unlocking the Truth. They started out as street performers, got discovered and got a major Sony record deal, but kept struggling to understand the music business while being barely 13 years old themselves. They just want to play music, make an album, and get paid, while their manager is trying to handle the business end and get the boys to act more mature in meetings and showcases. The movie was really funny (often due to the boys' frank honesty and lack of a filter), and they are really talented, like guitar-shredding, drumming talents who have since opened for Metallica, Motorhead, Guns 'N' Roses, Queens of the Stone Age, and Marilyn Manson. There often was talk about the boys standing out as black kids playing metal, and being accused of being a gimmick or a token act. The kids have serious metal influences, and already so skilled at 13, they will likely just get better with more life experience and training. It was really cool to see.

Thursday, June 4, 2015

The Prophecy - A Film Review


The Prophecy is a 1995 fantasy-thriller film written and directed by Gregory Widen, and featuring a stellar cast: Christopher Walken, Eric Stoltz, Elias Koteas, Virginia Madsen, Adam Goldberg, Amanda Plummer, and Viggo Mortensen. The film begins with a prologue of the First War between Heaven and angels, where fallen angels who refused to accept God’s elevation of mankind above all others were cast out and lost His love; the creation of Hell and Lucifer’s fall from grace, and the angels who have remained loyal to God and are protectors of mankind, and trying to be brothers again. It’s a fascinating film about faith, Catholicism, and questioning God’s presence and love, as both the angels and mankind have felt abandoned by His voice and feel lost and confused without Him.

                The film’s story begins with Thomas Dagget (Koteas), who is about to be ordained as a priest, but receives horrifying visions of angels warring with each other, and is traumatized. He loses his faith, and several years later, has become a police detective with the LAPD. Meanwhile, two angels have fallen to Earth. Simon (Stoltz), is an angel on mankind’s side, and warns Dagget of coming events. The other angel, Uziel (Jeff Cadiente), is described as having the “strength of God” and is a lower soldier angel and Lt. to the archangel Gabriel (Walken).Uziel tries to kill Simon, but Simon overpower him and destroys him. His body and death is investigated by Dagget, triggering his memories of the Church and a missing passage from the Book of Revelations about a second war Heaven by the fallen angels, and a prophecy involving the use of a “dark soul” that will be used as a deadly weapon. The dark soul to be used is the soul of a recently-deceased Korean War veteran named Hawthorne, who had a dark and disturbing past from the war. Gabriel wants to use his soul to fulfill the prophecy, but Simon has stolen it, and is determined to keep Gabriel from reaching it, in any way he can.

                Stoltz gives a great performance as Simon, portraying as an angel who is good-hearted, but tired of fighting the battle constantly with the fallen angels. He plays him more like an actual person than like an ethereal figure, and combined with his long dark coat and shaggy hair, looks more grunge than angelic. When he is injured and hiding in a school, he meets a little girl who finds him while she’s playing with her friends. When he asks her name and she states, “Mary,” he repeats her name to himself with a sarcastic tone of voice to himself, as in, “Of course, out of all the girls in this town, I meet the one with the same name as her.” It’s a wry and funny moment, and all coming from Stoltz’s knowing delivery.

               
Christopher Walken plays Gabriel with a mix of menace and dark humor. He is often impatient with people, and treats people like they are gnats in the way of his course, through knocking humans out with a light touch to the forehead or ripping out the hearts of angels trying to stop him. His dark humor mostly comes from him teasing humans for being naïve, innocent, or immature, and not worthy of the unconditional love that God has bestowed upon them. He uses suicide victims (Goldberg and Plummer) as his human helpers, keeping them in limbo between life and death, and a lot of dark and sick humor comes from their interactions and the helpers being in obvious resentment of this angel keeping him alive just to drive him around and do his errands.

In Gabriel’s exchange with Simon during a battle scene, he speaks of the pain and anguish that he has felt since God has cast him out, and wanting to return to paradise:

                Simon: I’m so tired of this war.
                Gabriel: Reject the lie, Simon. Join us! Help make it like it was before the monkeys. You remember? We cast out Lucifer’s army, you and I. We threw their rebel thrones from the wall.
                Simon: They wanted to be gods.
                Gabriel: I don’t want to be a god, Simon. I just wanna make it like it was, before the lie. When he loved us best.

                Although Gabriel has a cold demeanor about him, in that moment, he does become a sympathetic character, a person who is devastated about being banished and not hearing God’s voice anymore. Simon says to him, “Oh, Gabriel. When was it that you lost your grace? I’d like to help you, but I’m not sure who’s right or who’s wrong. It doesn’t matter. Sometimes you just have to do what you’re told. That’s who you are.” It is a powerful scene full of loss and regret of losing friends and the love of one’s creator, and Walken and Stoltz play the scene magnificently.

                Dagget has been struggling with his Catholic faith and being abandoned by God on the day he needed him most, so his loss of faith and confusion parallels with Gabriel’s need to reach Heaven and win back God’s love. It is prevalent through the film, as he is emotionally exhausted, and searching for answers. Koteas delivers an understated and heartfelt performance in this film, as he often looks drained and worn-out in trying to understand why he has been brought back into confronting his faith and overcoming his past struggles to re-gain his faith. His faith is what makes him human, what makes him have a soul. And at the same time, the angels have faith too, yet they do not have souls like humans. Koteas doesn’t play the role like a macho hero, nor is he jaded about life. He is just understandably confused about why God’s voice wasn’t there for him, and why the angels need him now. There’s a great moment where he is speaking with Katherine (Madsen) about the real purpose of angels outside of their innocent and holy image:

                “Did you ever notice how in the Bible, whenever God needed to punish someone, or make an example, or whenever God needed a killing, he sent an angel? Did you ever wonder what a creature like that must be like? A whole existence spent praising your God, but always with one wing dipped in blood. Would you ever want to really see an angel?”

                It is a fascinating take on the stories of angels, and seeing angels not as innocent guardians but as warriors sent to do God’s bidding on missions that may involve punishment and murder. Dagget also states that in a verse from St. Paul, there was one line that always stuck with him: “Even now in Heaven there were angels carrying savage weapons.” It is a haunting line that carries resonance with the film.

               
One of the best performances in the film belongs to Viggo Mortensen, who appears late in the film, with only three scenes as Lucifer, but delivers a scene-stealing and mesmerizing performance. He is calm, collected, and captivating on-screen. He plays Lucifer like a beast, with lowered, glowering eyes, predatory stances, and a low, intimidating purr in his voice. Even him just plucking a flower while speaking shows an utter disrespect for life. He doesn’t give a damn about any of the humans, he is only getting involved because Gabriel wants to turn Heaven into another Hell, and that is Lucifer’s domain. Mortensen’s performance is brilliant, especially in delivering lines like, “Humans – and how I love you talking monkeys for this – know more about war and treachery than any angel,” or “God? God is love. I don’t love you,” said with cold eyes and a hiss.


                The film, while not well-remembered today, was a box office success, earning twice its budget in revenue, and mixed reviews from critics. It has a stellar cast, and is an interesting story about angels warring with each other, and the humans that get caught up in the crossfire. I highly recommend it.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Dirty Girl - A Film Review



Dirty Girl is a 2010 coming-of-age dramedy written and directed by Abe Sylvia. The film stars Juno Temple, Jeremy Dozier, Milla Jovovich, Dwight Yoakam, and Mary Steenburgen, with cameos by William H. Macy and Tim McGraw.  Sylvia based this fictional film on his own experiences as a teen boy in 1980s Oklahoma.

The film centers on two teenagers in 1987 Oklahoma who are outcasts: Danielle (Temple), a troubled and promiscuous teen girl who never knew her father, has a strained relationship with her nosy mother (Jovovich), and hates her mother’s Mormon fiancé (Macy), who is controlling and abusive in his methods to force his religion and rules on Danielle; and Clarke (Dozier), an overweight gay teen boy who is shy at school, is pressured to act straight by his homophobic father (Yoakam), is close to his sympathetic mother (Steenburgen) and secretly loves pop stars like Pat Benetar, Debbie Harry, and Melissa Manchester. The two meet in a high school class for “slow” students, and are partnered together in a class project where they are “married” and have to take care of a bag of flour as their “child.” They bond over their social weirdness and find kinship with one another, and, when both have had enough of the pressure from their families to conform, steal Jeremy’s dad’s car and hit the road to find Danielle’s absentee father in Fresno, CA.

The film is carried by two talented and spirited performances by Temple and Dozier. Both infuse their characters with a sympathetic air and a humor that cuts through a lot of the angst that they are going through. Dozier excelled at playing Clarke, a kid who is more self-assured around Danielle than anyone else, and gains the courage to be gay and unapologetic for it. And Temple shined in this role, making Danielle caring and kind underneath her bad-girl exterior, bringing out both vulnerability and a devil-may-care attitude that made her an awesome person. Temple, in particular, is a very talented and charismatic actress who has been great in indie films like Cracks and The Brass Teapot, despite the mixed to negative reviews of some of her films, and has developed a stellar career in the indie film world while being overlooked in the mainstream media.


The supporting cast give admirable performances, but the film centers on the two teen characters. The story is creative and interesting, as a coming-of-age road trip movie starring two high school outcasts who shake off the confines of their environment and find their identities. It also has a great soundtrack of 80’s women-led pop songs, opening beautifully with Pat Benetar’s “Shadows of the Night”; Bow Wow Wow’s “I Want Candy” over Clarke dancing in his room; Joan Jett’s “Do You Want to Touch Me” as Danielle struts across school, and Sheena Easton’s “Strut” in a roadside bar scene. The film was charming and likable, and was quite better than the initial title and image, which give a raunchy idea of what the movie would be about. It is streaming on Netflix, and I definitely recommend it, as well as Temple’s other indie films (more notably The Brass Teapot and Cracks).

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Darkman - A Film Review



Darkman is a 1990 superhero film directed and co-written by Sam Raimi. It stars Liam Neeson, Frances McDormand, Larry Drake, and Colin Friels. It is a tribute to 1930s Universal horror films, and was made after Sam Raimi was turned down as a director for The Shadow movie.

The film is about a scientist named Peyton Westlake (Neeson) who is nearly killed by crime boss Robert G. Durant (Drake) and corrupt developer Louis Strack, Jr. (Friels) through being tortured and left for dead in a science lab explosion, but survives. He was being targeted because his girlfriend, attorney Julie Hastings (McDormand), had a memo that implicated her developer boss in dirty zoning deals with crime syndicates, and the memo was in his lab. However, his face and hands are burned off, and the doctors gave him a special treatment that involved severing his nerves, which left him with an inability to feel pain, but heightened emotions due to adrenal overload, which, when he becomes highly emotional, he has enhanced strength.

Westlake had been trying to develop a synthetic skin to replace burnt or damaged skin, but the skin was photosensitive and kept melting in the light. He figured out a way to keep the skin intact for 99 minutes in the light, and that the skin could survive in the dark. After his near-death, he develops skin through 3-D printing and makes a replica of his original face, as well as the faces of his killers, in order to seek vengeance.  He poses as the gangsters often to either kill them or trick them into killing each other.  While he is successful at seeking justice, he is frequently set back by the mask time limits and his struggles with his scientific experiments.

The film is a dark and sad story, more along the lines of The Phantom of the Opera and House of Wax, as well as The Crow graphic novel, than a triumphant superhero story. It is rare to see a superhero story that is an original character, and not adapted from a comic book/graphic novel. Darkman was very successful, both on a box office level and a cult following level, and spawned two sequels: Darkman II: The Return of Durant, and Darkman III: Die Darkman Die.


Liam Neeson delivers an honest and sympathetic  performance as Westlak, the caring scientist whose life is destroyed by Durant and Strack, and who becomes Darkman in his quest for vengeance. While he doesn’t feel remorse over killing Durant’s henchmen, he often feels sadness and anger over losing Julie, his livelihood, and being reduced to a monstrous face wrapped up in bandages. Some of the saddest scenes in the film are when Peyton is alone in his makeshift lab in an abandoned building, screaming and crying, unable to control his emotion levels. Even if he defeats the villains and Julie accepts him, he’ll never have his life back, always changing masks 99 minutes at a time.

Frances McDormand delivers a strong and measured performance, albeit in a role that is mostly reduced to being the girlfriend. Julie is intelligent and strong-willed, and is an intellectual match for Peyton. She isn’t a victim or a damsel, and investigates into the background surrounding Peyton’s supposed death.

Larry Drake is fantastic as Durant. He brings the right kind of menace and humor to this role, and gives a lot of character to this role. It is clear that Drake is enjoying playing Durant, and it is one of his best performances ever.

Colin Friel was excellent as Strack, playing a sleazy and slimeball yuppie prick. He is so without morals that, just a few days after Peyton’s supposed death, he’s already putting the moves on Julie, a still-grieving girlfriend. He is low and despicable, but a great villain in this film.

Danny Elfman did the music score, and it is epic and beautiful. Like I previously stated in my review of Nightbreed, Elfman can take his Batman score and re-work it to sound strong, dark, and exciting for any low-budget sci-fi or horror film to have. His talent is a gift that elevates any film because of his magnificent score.

Sam Raimi has a talent for making films that have relatable, interesting characters; great action sequences (a sequence involving a helicopter is phenomenal); dark humor, and a sci-fi or horror brent. His films feels unique and special, a creative touch that is of his own style.


Darkman is an excellent film. It is sad and epic and powerful, is a standout in the genre of superhero films and is a wonderful tribute to the Universal horror films that were so beloved to Raimi’s childhood.